HuffPost: “Mommy, take us home and we will never ask for food again”

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The dire situation of Greek families facing economic hardship crossed the big ocean and reached the United States. In an article with heartbreaking examples, The Huffington Post highlights the plight of many families who cannot feed their children, the malnutrition spreading among elementary and high-school children and the many civic initiatives to give a helping hand and a warm meal to the thousands in need.

Mommy, I Promise We Will Never Be Hungry Again!

“Mommy, take us home and we will never ask for food again!” With this heartbreaking cry, a girl residing at a nursery in the Kallithea area of Athens tugs on her mother’s skirt and begs her to take her and her two siblings back home. The mother, visiting to cuddle and play with her children at the nursery that is providing them with food and shelter, runs away crying as she can not afford to take her children with her.

“But, sweetheart, we have nothing to eat at home,” she replies. Undaunted, the child continues with a seriousness way beyond her years, “Mommy, take us home and we will never be hungry again, I promise you!”

This story, along with many other similar tales of destitute families unable to feed and clothe their children, has become so common in Greece that UNICEF reports an unbelievable 600,000 of the country’s young are malnourished and living below the poverty line.

es, the phenomenon of malnutrition has become a reality in Greece ever since the beginning of the debt crisis in 2010, forcing a growing number of organizations and individuals into a daily fight to feed the hungry. For, hanging from most public garbage cans around Athens, one can find neatly packed bags full of cooked food waiting to be picked up. Almost like a secret code among the public, it is understood that these rations have been placed there for their needy co-citizens.

In dozens of Athenian suburbs, such as Keratsini, Tambouria, Agia Varvara, Peristeri and Ano Liosia to name but a few, but also in Western Thessaloniki and in Crete, there are ever-increasing incidents of starved students fainting in class. This has led to a rush by the myriad of Parents’ Associations in the country, in the face of an absentee government, to provide assistance to the families in dire economic straits. (Read full article here)