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National Day Parades (Mar 25/12) To Take Place as Usual – Despite Fear of Protests

The National Day parades on March 25th 2012 will take place as usual, the Papademos government decided on Monday, despite fears of mass protests. At a meeting of the ministers of Interior, Education, Defense, Justice and Citizens’ Protection under PM Papademos, it has been also decided that all the members of the government will be present.  Operational issues of the police on that critical day have not been discussed at the meeting on Monday morning, however according to sources, there will be a high operational readiness on the side of the Greek police. Speaking to news portal in.gr,the same source underlined the necessity that all political parties, social organizations and the media should condemn violent events “as these phenomena undermine the Republic”.

With growing anger due to harsh austerity measures, Greek politicians became often the target of angry citizens during parades. Last week, three members of the Greek parliament were forced to leave the parade tribune in Rhodes, when protesters hurled yogurts against them.

In Thessaloniki, the big National Day parade of October 28th was cancelled and the President of the Republic left when protesters shouted insults against Karolos Papoulias.

The big military parade on March 25th, the day to commemorate the Greek revolution against the Turkish Occupation, takes place in Athens. In 2011, Greeks booed politicians after the March-25th parade in Athens.

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19 comments

  1. “With growing anger due to harsh austerity measures, Greek politicians became often the target of angry citizens during parades. Last week, three members of the Greek parliament were forced to leave the parade tribune in Rhodes, when protesters hurled yogurts against them”. Yep, and we will do it again!

    • keeptalkinggreece

      WHAT? are you this kind of person? wasting your money in times of economic crisis?

      • I only do screaming not throwing. I would probably just hit something if I did. But for sure, others will. But if I got some leftovers, I might bring it.

        • keeptalkinggreece

          the government says we should all condemnc such actions and so we do.

        • Leftovers, ok, that’s better. But pls also think of the international reaction! You know how it is in the internet era, those pictures will be seen all around the world. And people will say “wow, this Greek yoghurt must be as lousy as rotten tomatos if people throw it away!”
          Come on, think of the impact on the Greek yoghurt export industry. This is very negative adversing. If you want to throw something, better use a foreign product, like bananas!

          • That’s seen in many countries as utter racist. Especially during football matches.
            But in general I am totally against throwing with food. My late mother taught me early on never to play or waist food.

          • Yup, that’s right, Antonis! My mom, too.

            Btw, today’s news said the average German throws 82 kilos of food away every year. Maybe we should at least use those leftovers for targetting something else than simply the garbage bin, too?
            😀

          • keeptalkinggreece

            would you like to eat household leftovers? I wouldn’t….

          • My not-so-serious idea was rather that people should use those leftovers to throw them at the politicians, and not good food!

            Of course, if this gained traction, we’d probably need more heavy set and solid politicians. Folks whop don’t tripple over once they’re hit with half a loaf of old bread…
            🙂

          • keeptalkinggreece

            OK, now it makes sense lol

  2. Ok, parades, protests, business as usual. Normalcy. Nice.

    But can anyone pls tell me when the election campaigns will start? Afaics, there may be election in less than two months from now, but judging from the media, it doesn’t look as if the parties care much about making their case to the voters. No big programs, no grand speeches, no slogans and talking points, and most importantly no answers to the most urgent question of all now: What would your party do differently?

    Hmm, that’s normal for campaign time in Greece?

    • keeptalkinggreece

      officially the elections date has not be set yet. It will happen after the signatures have been put under the 2nd bailout, ie. in the days after March 15. Unofficially the elections campaigns started on the weekend – if you have heard Samaras and Venizelos speech. Samaras even promised minimum pension 700 euro….

      • Big promises from Samaras instead? Minimum pension 700 €? And probably also the tax cuts he’s being talking about for years now? Will anybody dare to ask him how he wants to finance that? 8-/

        Looks like more of the same politics as usual to me. Greece desperately needs to replace all those untrustworthy demagogues with a new generation of people of honesty and integrity!

    • Yes, that’s normal. No programs, no talking points and especially no answers on important questions. Just posturing and playing up the strong man card. Grand speeches we will get, just before the elections. On Syntagma or some other big square with busloads of official supporters with official flags and the tv-coverage will make you dizzy, because public television will have floating and flowing camera shots all the time.
      Sit back, relax and enjoy the Great Greek Elections!!!

      • That’s weird. Why is this so different in Greece than in other democratic countries? And why do people still vote for such lamers who so quite obviously don’t show much interest in getting elected?
        *scratchingmyhead*

        • Because Greece is “a special case”? Greece is “unique”? “It’s the Greek way”? Greece has such a special history that nobody needs to spell out their policies as long as it is Greek?
          Or more in general, because who ever reads policy programs like they are produced in the rest of Europe? (OK, I have to admid, I did…). But in most of those countries it is more and more the gut feeling that decide who one votes for. So, even in this area, Greece seems to be once again been at the forefront of developments and a real pioneer!

    • iaourti iaourtaki

      Looks like everyone already accepted that they have postponed these snap-elections that were on 4th of Nov fixed to happen on Feb 19th?