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ATM withdrawals with extra charge go into effect on July 1st 2019

The new pricing policy of Greek banks goes into effect on Monday, July 1st 2019, for money withdrawals from an ATM of a bank other than the card issuer. The measure aims to equalize Greek bank card holders with tourists, but also those holders of foreign bank cards or electronic money cards.

At the same time, the extra charge is an inevitable one-way street for those Greeks living on the country side or the islands, where often there is only one bank, not necesserily the one from which they had their card issued.

Holders of Greek credit and debit cards will be charged with a commission of 1.5-3 euros per transaction when they withdraw money from the ATM of another bank. The charge will be equivalent to the amount of withdrawn money.

The measure was supposed to be implemented of July 20the, but with exception of Piraeos Bank that will implement the extra change as of 22. July 2019. All other Greek systemic banks implement it as to today.

Analytically the bank charges via dikaiologitika.

Alpha Bank

Withdrawals from ATMs of other banks in Greece and the Eurozone

Up to € 150: € 1.50

From 160 to 250 euros: 1,60 euros

More than 250 euros: 1,65 euros

Withdrawals at ATM outside the Eurozone

1% of the withdrawal amount with a minimum of € 4.40 per transaction



Eurobank

ATM withdrawals from other banks in Greece and the Eurozone

EUR 1,60 irrespective of amount

Withdrawals at ATM outside the Eurozone

1.05% of the withdrawal amount.

National Bank

ATM withdrawals from other banks in Greece and the Eurozone

Up to € 150: € 1.30

From 160 to 250 euros: 1.40 euros

More than 250 EUR: 1,60 EUR

Withdrawals at ATM outside the Eurozone

1% of the withdrawal amount with a minimum of EUR 3 and a maximum of EUR 5 per transaction.

Piraeus Bank

ATM withdrawals from other banks in Greece and the Eurozone

Up to € 250: € 1.40

Over EUR 250: EUR 2.20

Withdrawals at ATM outside the Eurozone

Expenses 4 euro per transaction plus 2% on the withdrawal amount with a minimum of 1 euro and a maximum of 30 euro per transaction.

* It is noted that the changes in Piraeus Bank will start on July 22nd.

It is not clear whether the extra fee of €1.3 – €2.2 through the domestic DIAS system, a fee charged  when card holders withdraw money from a different Greek bank. The DIAS charge depends on the amount of withdrawn money and on the bank.

 

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5 comments

  1. Xenos_sthn_A8hna

    The next stage will be that your own bank will charge you for taking your own money out in cash. This is a common strategy across the world, where banks are determined to stop people from using cash. Why? Because they can make bigger profits with virtual money: cash requires physical counting when you pay money in, and cash dispenser machines when you take money out.

    And, of course, our governments do nothing to control the banks. The usual story. There is an additional component, though: in certain countries (e.g. the UK) there is no protection of customer privacy and the banks hand over all the data about your activities to the State. We know this because recently some asylum seekers were told that they should not travel away from their residence in the UK (this is itself an attack on their rights) and had their applications refused for buying train tickets using a bank card. The banking info was used against them as evidence.

    This is a nasty harbinger of where things are going for all of us — with money, banks and politicians. Orwell’s 1984 is a bit late in coming, but it is surely well on the way.

    • A cashless society is super vulnerable to a cyber attack . Even a software update can screw everything up . eg the TSB bank in UK last year .

    • Greece is so unattractive to prospective foreigners who would consider purchasing property. Internet, food, fuel, banking & not forgetting the systemic fraud that prevails. Greece is close to becoming a failed state. So much so that ini ts desperation it intends to exploit possible oil reserves just as the rest of Europe is turning its back on such a disastrous commodity. And of course risking its precious asset….tourism.
      Greece has sold its soul for the sake if the €

  2. Xenos_sthn_A8hna

    What happened to my reply to this??