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Eleni Topaloudi: Greek, Albanian defendants found “guilty” for brutal rape and murder

One of the most heinous crimes in Greece: 21-year-old university student Eleni Topaloudi was brutally raped,, tortured and murdered by two young men on the island of Rhodes in November 2018. One and a half years later, justice was served, when a mix jury court in Athens unanimously found both defendants “guilty.”
The perpetrators, a 23-year-old Greek, reportedly an offspring of a well-known family on Rhodes, and a 21 year-old Albanian national, ultimately threw the abused body of the young woman, over a 10-meter cliff and left her to die.
Forensic examination showed that Eleni was still alive when thrown over the cliff, the evidence pointed at the two defendants and their guilt.
The details of the exceptional brutal crime had shocked the Greek society that demanded justice.
The Mixed Jury court in Athens unanimously founded that the two defendants were guilty as charged and committed the rape and the premeditated murder in a state of calmness.
The two can be sentenced up to life imprisonment if the court rejects the lawyers’ plea for “mitigating circumstance” for the murder and up to 15 years each for the rape.

Friday afternoon, the court sentenced each of the defendants to life imprisonment plus 15 years for the rape.

The court accepted the prosecutor’s proposal that the defendants “do not deserve any mitigating circumstances.”

One of the defendants, the Albanian national, is going on trial beginning of June for the rape of another young woman, one with disabilities. He had reportedly also an accomplice when he committed the second crime.

Trial politicized

The trial of Topaloudi ‘s murderers on Thursday, suddenly took a political turn when the prosecutor said in her closing argument that “the lies began from the time the lawyers entered the case.”

The remark sparked tension in the courtroom, the representative of the Athens Bar Association protested, the  prosecutor threatened to abstain and the president of the Bar Association asked the Supreme Court to reprimand the prosecutor over “her defamatory remarks directed against the lawyers of the defendants.”

For some “unknown” reason, a state minister of ruling New Democracy felt the need to intervene and posted on social media in what it seemed an effort to teach a lesson to the prosecutor. State Minister Akis Skertsos is neither lawyer nor has any connection to Justice.
The post was understood as an intervention of the government into the trial.
As expected Skertsos’ intervention sparked a new round of tension between the government and opposition parties SYRIZA, KINAL, KKE and Elliniki Lysi, parties that criticized the government with issued statements.
The minister later issued a statement claiming he was expressing his personal opinion and this statements  were “misunderstood.”
The uncle of Eleni Topaloudi, who is a lawyer, wondered about the political intervention short before the verdict.
The father of the brutally murdered victim urged all sides to stop misusing his dead daughter as a political tool.

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3 comments

  1. Thank God. Eleni was killed less than 500 meters from my home in Pefkos. The details of this crime, and the background of the defendants, is very well known to all residents of Rhodes. Finally, justice for Eleni…

  2. Fotis Tsimboukakis

    These 2 criminals need to be “put to sleep” in prison, like they did to Eleni. The saddest part is they never admitted anything , took responsibility and/or asked for forgiveness, never showed remorse.
    Their attorneys should also be investigated as there is no doubt in anyone’s mind that they worked TIRELESSLY to find excuses for this heinous crime. The family of the wealthy Greek kid in this should also be ostracized from the life of the island, for their relentless lack of remorse and understanding in finding excuses for this crime.

    • Totally agree. Because of various clauses in the Human Rights Act and the weakness of the judiciary bowing to political and popular pressure, sentencing is way too lenient on the most vile of its citizens. Castration at the neck would be my choice of justice.