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Epic Typo: UNESCO ‘Word’ Heritage in Philippi archaeological site

We all hate typos – especially when they drop put our editing review and the readers find them. It is indeed annoying when readers point out at our errors and correct us. The good thing is that we can write our text in PC, we can correct them in zero time. And we hope that not many readers took notice of them. A typo is a problem we can live with.

The bad thing is when our typos appear in another form of material like …when they are engraved on a official plaque. And even worse, when nobody sees the error and the plaque is exposed to the public with beating drums and sounding trumpets.

This happened to the Culture Ministry at the inauguration of a marble inscription proudly announcing that the ancient Theater of Philippi belongs to the World Heritage of UNESCO.

World heritage or Word Heritage?

At a special event on Sunday, culture Minister Lydia Koniordou revealed the memorial plaque and every English-speaking, word-freak cat in Greece burst into a loud laughter.

Minister Lydia Koniordou seems to notice the typo….

The ancient theatre of Philippi is an important and remarkable monument. It is located at the feet of the acropolis and it is supported on the eastern wall of the city of Philippi. Eventhough it has sustained many changes throughout the centuries and some interventions so that it can host the Philippi Festival, it still preserves many of its original elements.

Opposite the ancient theatre of Philippi there are the ruins of the ancient city. The ancient city took its name in 356 b.c. after the father of Alexander the Great, Philippos the II.

The excavations have brought to light ruins from the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Paleochristian period.The octagon, the Roman forum, the paleochristian basilicas and parts of the city walls, are some of the most well known.

Philippi was made a World Heritage Site in 2016.

According to UNESCO, the ancient theater of Philippi was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List due to following criteria:

Criterion (iii): Philippi is an exceptional testimony to the incorporation of regions into the Roman Empire as demonstrated by the city’s layout and architecture as a colony resembling a “small Rome”. The remains of its churches are exceptional testimony to the early establishment and growth of Christianity.

Criterion (iv): The monuments of Philippi exemplify various architectural types and reflect the development of architecture during the Roman and Early Christian period. The Forum stands out as an example of such a public space in the eastern Roman provinces. The Octagon Church, the transept Basilica, and the domed Basilica stand out as types of Early Christian architecture.

Integrity

The walled city includes all elements necessary to convey its values, and is not subject to development or neglect. The modern asphalted road, closed in 2014, which essentially follows the route of the ancient Via Egnatia, will be dismantled east of the west entrance to the site near the Museum.

Authenticity

The walled city was subject to major destruction in the earthquake of 620 CE. Many stones and elements of the buildings including inscriptions and mosaic and opus sectile floors remain in situ from that time, although some stones were subsequently reused in later buildings. Modern constructions and interventions at the site have been generally limited to archaeological investigations and necessary measures for the protection and enhancement of the site. For the most part the principle of reversibility has been respected and the walled city can be considered authentic in terms of form and design, location and setting.

UPDATE: Culture Minister Lydia Koniordou said later that the spelling error on the inscription was corrected.

PS I think, the plaque must be included in the World Heritage of Epic Word Typos

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