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Olli Rehn: Greece Has Achieved More Than Is Often Realized

Greeks should be proud! For the compliments made by EU Commissioner for Monetary Affairs, Olli Rehn. In an article he wrote for Wall Street Journal about the euro crisis, Olli Rehn wrote among others:

“Over the last two years, Europe has made remarkable progress in addressing these imbalances. Consider the three euro-zone countries under full economic adjustment programs:

  • Ireland has been able to re-access the markets earlier than envisaged.
  • Portugal is seeing stronger-than-expected export growth, which is helping to offset weaker domestic demand.

And even in Greece, more has been achieved than is often realized. The current Greek government is committed to reforms and enjoys broad parliamentary backing. Negotiations are ongoing over the future of the Greek economic adjustment program.”

In his article “How We’ll Build European Monetary Union/Europe is committed to building a genuine economic union to strengthen our existing monetary union,”, Olli Rehn wrote that “the euro zone is at a decisive juncture, not only in its three-year-old debt crisis but in its 13-year-old history.”

I assume, the EU Commissioner wants to promote his achievements for whatever possible reason.

 Olli Rehn can be proud to have achieved goals that have impoverished large parts of the EU population.

 I doubt, he has any idea, how people live, struggle and try to make ends meet, anyway.

Rehn’s Full Article Here

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12 comments

  1. I don’t know about Greece, but, being portuguese, I’m can inform you that 42% of the export growth in my country is the gold of common people (not gold reserves, nor mining, which we don’t have), rings, and so on, going mainly to Belgium. It grew 83% this year., and 132 times more than in 2007, in the firts six months. and fuel and lubrificants, from a big enterprise. No jobs created. Not a great economic achievement.

  2. I forgot to add: they know nothing and don’t care. They play with numbers and talk an elaborate, bureucratic meaningless language we call here “lingua de pau” (wood tongue;))

  3. keeptalkinggreece

    do you also have in Portugal those shops “I buy your gold and rip you off”?

  4. These sharks are everywhere, DO NOT TRUST THEM OR USE THEM.

    I have a friend who is a jewellery maker. Last year she decided that her “scrap” box was a little over-full and she went to sell it. Her “scrap” is mostly silver, collected from car-boot sales, auctions etc because it happened to have a stone she needed etc. Anyway, she ended up with close to 8 kg of 925 silver. The “We buy your gold” shop made a really big song and dance about offering her .35€ per gram, even showed her beautiful graphs and tables outlining the decline in the price of silver etc, and of course how good they were giving her the price they would.
    She then phoned her usual buyer in the UK who promptly offered her .57£ per gram. And apologised for the low price…
    These guys are sharks, preying on the panic of people facing a severe decline in their income.

  5. Yes we have, like mushrooms, in every corner. Great business. People are selling their wedding rings, and other family jewels, things we inhereted from our parents and grand parents. That’s not only loss of material value, this is heartbreking. So, misery and depression are our greatest contributions to the world economy.
    I get very angry when I hear our prime minister bragging about the superavit of our commercial deficit, the first since 1942, in Salazar times. That’s easy, like in those days, people have no money to buy things, so we don’t import.
    Our politicians don’t no nothing and don’t care. Like Olli Rehn they say those irrelevant, bureaucratic things, with no connection with reality, a language we call “lingua de pau” (wood tongue).
    I’m sorry for my bad english. Godd luck to Greece.

  6. Since the economy went down a few years ago, I get accosted all the time in North American malls. Then I tell them to take a look and see if it looks like I am wearing any gold,and they ask if I have anything at home. When I say no I just wear found-iron jewelry picked up from the roads if I ever wear any, they don’t give me one of their flyers.Next time I may look at the price to see how much they rip people off by.

  7. “How We’ll Build European Monetary Union/Europe is committed to building a genuine economic union to strengthen our existing monetary union”
    ===
    United States of Europe probably is the ultimate target lurking here, poor boneheads just seem to be way too afraid to even say it out loud.

    Anyhow, it would be nice to know how much this topic has lately been under public discussion across Europe. Not so much in Finland.

  8. keeptalkinggreece

    I think, mos tinterested in this specific topic are the Brits …

  9. Thet are everywere, like mushrooms. People are seling their wedding rings and gold jewelry they inherited from their parents and great parents. Is not only the materil value,it’s a great sentimental loss. Our great contribution to the world economy is misery and depression. Our prime minister is brgging about our recent surplus in commercial trade, the first since the forties in past century, in the times of Salazar. That’s easy, like in those days, people have no money to consume,so we don’t import.

  10. keeptalkinggreece

    I believe that despite EU, IMF and German officials telling us how good Portugal is doing. Again, priority is given to the country and not to citizens who pay the price for economic mismanagement by politicians.

  11. keeptalkinggreece

    we call it here “ξύλινη γλώσσα” wooden tongue too lol

  12. I’m sorry, I repeated this. I thought I couldn’t make this comment before.