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Greece To Chase “Corrupt” SIEMENS Executives?

There is an interesting development in the Greece- SIEMENS bribes scandal coming from Germany. According to a report by Sueddeutsche Zeitung/The Local.de, Greek judiciary is to pursue elven executives of SIEMENS on charges of bribing Greek politicians and public officials. Moreover Greece plans even to issue an international arrest warrant for chase the bribers. However, some SIEMENS executives plan to appeal to the European Court of Human Rights as “an international arrest warrant would impinge on their human rights” as they claim.

 Greece chases ‘corrupt’ Siemens executives

 Greek prosecutors are planning to issue international warrants for 11 Siemens executives, though their cases have already been closed by German courts. The execs say they will appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

The Greek judiciary is pursuing the executives of the German technology giant – including former CEO Heinrich von Pierer – on charges of bribing Greek politicians and public officials to win lucrative contracts.

But since the cases have already been dealt with by German courts – either through convictions or settlements – the executives say that an international arrest warrant would impinge on their human rights, the Süddeutsche Zeitung newspaper reported on Tuesday.

Should warrants be issued, some of the men are planning to appeal to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, one of the execs told the paper anonymously.

The case is a reminder of that of former Siemens board chairman Volker Jung, who was detained in Greece in June 2009, and forced to stay in the country for over a year while corruption charges were investigated. When Jung finally returned to Germany, an international arrest warrant was issued.

Though German authorities refused to deport him because he had been cleared of the charges by German state prosecutors, any other European country would be bound to arrest him and send him to Greece if he travelled there, leaving him unable to travel.

A similar fate now faces his former colleagues. Most of the 11 executives have faced a German court and been sentenced. Others, like Jung and Pierer, have paid fines without admitting any guilt, and their cases are considered closed.

One of the executives told the Süddeutsche Zeitung that their appeal to Strasbourg would be based on the legal principle that someone cannot be tried twice for the same crime.

The Greek judiciary is under pressure to deal with such cases, since the crisis-hit country reportedly loses millions of euros of tax revenue every year through corruption. But the Siemens executives argue that such cases could harm the country in the long run, as it will discourage investors.” (Local.de & Sueddeutsche Zeitung /GER)

“But the Siemens executives argue that such cases could harm the country in the long run, as it will discourage investors.” LOL

Clever SIEMENS managers’ tricks? Most possible. SIEMENS sat already in court in Nigeria and the USA as well…

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8 comments

  1. Clever GREEK tricks? They will force these Siemens guys to give them the names of every single Greek politician, civil servant, businessman and journalist that they have payed bribes to in exchange for dropping the charges against them…?

    • Get the names, drop the charges, for a little extra… Then go after the names and don’t press charges, for a little extra…

      • You are thinking inside the box. The Greek box that is. I was thinking of utopia: Get the names, go after those names, prosecute them, throw them in jail and drop the charges against those who were the first to tell those names. Then go to those who are now in jail and offer them a plea-bargain if they can provide the names and info about the top of the heap.
        Ah, that is a nice dream!

        • I’m learning, so are you 🙂 Never expect a dog to bite the hand that feeds it. Unless we (as in Europeans) change dogs, no biting will ever happen…

          • Tell that to my German Shepherd… I know better than not to expect him to bite my hand, as he used to be a street dog here in Greece. But we still love each other. 😀

            • Ahh, but he’s German… What do you expect :)?

              • giaoýrti giaoyrtáki

                He will remember Greek names better than any manager of Siemens. Just look at the Troikans and why negotiations take so long: They have problems to find translators and are to lazy to learn the language.